Grumbling and gratitude are, for the child of God, in conflict.
Be grateful and you won’t grumble. Grumble and you won’t be grateful.
— Billy Graham
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As Canadians, we have so much to be thankful for…

We have a standard of living that is the envy of most other nations on earth. There are literally billions of people who will never have what we have or live as we live. We are blessed—to the place where, if we really look as how much of the world lives it is actually, well, embarrassing. Now, I am not suggesting that we be ashamed of what God has so graciously provided for us, but to be thankful, of course. But what I do want to emphasize is that we check ourselves when it comes to our attitude of gratitude. With so much abundance, affluence, and comfort in our lives as Albertans who live in this beautiful and free Canada, it is appalling to think that we would spend one minute of our time or one ounce of our energy complaining that what we have isn’t enough, good enough, new enough, fresh enough, priced low enough, etc. The rest of the world would willingly take the junk in our garage, the food we throw away, and the old tools in our shed. So, I believe one of the greatest ways to give thanks isn’t only to be thankful, but to not complain. Hold your tongue. Before you speak, think about what you’re about to say and consider who is about to hear it. Is it true? Does it help? Will it hurt? Would God agree?

Take a few minutes and carefully read this article by Paul Tripp regarding Thanksgiving. I hope it will cause you to pause and do a heart-check, as it did me. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving this week and weekend with your family, friends, coworkers, and neighbours. Let’s make it our goal to stay on the hight road of thankfulness and away from the low road of complaining.

Warmly, Pastor Colin


13 Questions To Ask This Thanksgiving

By Paul Tripp

Every day of your life, you can find reasons to complain.

After all, you exist in a broken world, and life doesn't operate the way it was meant to. Family and friends will wrong you, good health will elude you, authority will exploit you, and so on and so forth.

I'm not giving you a license to complain; not at all. I'm just saying that it's not very difficult for people to come up with a laundry list of reasons to complain. Simply listen to the conversations around you; there's a lot of complaining going on!

At the same time, though, we can easily find a multitude of reasons to be thankful. God's common grace has provided us with an abundance of physical blessings. Around this time of the calendar year our culture is reminding us to find those blessings and to give thanks.

What does the Thanksgiving season reveal about the human heart? Two things, I think.

First, it reveals that the human heart is hardwired for gratitude; something inside our soul tells us that we should be a thankful people. But second, it shows that, by and large, we're not a thankful people. We relegate our thankfulness to only a few days each year, and most other days, we're grumbling, moaning and complaining.

So today, I want to write about the human heart, complaint, and thankfulness. Then, at the end of this post, I'll give you a 13-question assessment to measure your own heart. My hope is that you would use it as resource for your family and friends before or on Thanksgiving.

THE EYES OF THE HEART

I'm deeply persuaded that the root of our complaint, or the root of our gratitude, is the result of the way we view ourselves in our hearts.

Here's a breakdown of what happens.

The Entitled, Complaining Person

If I foolishly assume that I'm a good person, then I'll arrogantly assume that I'm a deserving person. I'll place myself in the center of my world and live with an "I deserve" attitude. Because I live with such a sense of entitlement, I'll develop an inflated and unrealistic sense of personal need.

Because I have an inflated and unrealistic sense of personal need, I'll expect the situations, locations, and relationships of everyday life to focus their energy on serving what I have named as personal needs. But in my foolishness and arrogance, I have forgotten that this universe wasn't created to serve me. I'm not the center of its attention, despite what I wish to think.

Inevitably, those people and places will fail to cater to, or even recognize, what I have named as personal needs. So, since I didn't get what I thought I deserve, I have a multitude of reasons to complain and grumble.

Where does this grumbling find its roots? In my heart, because I inaccurately viewed myself with foolishness and arrogance.

The Humble, Thankful Person

What if, instead of assuming that I'm a good and deserving person, I view myself accurately through the lens of Scripture?

The Bible tells me that everything in this universe was designed by, and for the glory of, God. That means this world, with all its created pleasures, was not meant to celebrate me. No, the created glories of this world are designed to be a finger celebrating the Creator. In other words, I'm not the center of this narrative.

On top of that, the Gospel tells me that I'm not a good person; in fact, I'm a wicked person, and the only thing I deserve in this life is God's wrath. So, if I remember that, in an act of outrageous grace, God turned his face of mercy and kindness towards me, and that every good thing in my life is an undeserved blessing, feelings of humility and thankfulness (rather than entitlement and disappointment) will fill my heart.

Instead of trying to exploit situations, locations and relationships in my life to serve me, I will now approach people and places with a servant's heart. I will be so overwhelmed with gratitude at the sacrifice of Christ that my life will now be defined by similar sacrifice.

Now that's a better way!

THE BOTTOM LINE

I guess what I'm trying to ask is this: how accurately are you viewing yourself?

Do you think you're a good and deserving person who has been unjustly forgotten? Or do you, like John Newton, view yourself as a wretch saved by amazing grace? It makes a world of difference.

Here's what I want you to do, either before or on Thanksgiving. Below are 13 questions for your personal assessment, to examine your heart. Don't rush through these, just to "check the box" for religious activity. Be honest and intentional about exposing your heart.

When we're honest with ourselves, with God, and with others, we'll discover that we're more arrogant, demanding, and entitled than we think. But don't be afraid of what may be revealed by honestly answering these questions

God has already forgiven us entirely on the Cross, and when we cry out for help, he supplies abundant and life-transforming grace to deliver us from a lifestyle of complaining and invite us into a lifestyle of gratitude.

THANKSGIVING ASSESSMENT

1. Would the people who live nearest to you characterize you as a complaining person or a thankful person?

2. When was the last time you sat down to literally count your blessings?

3. When was the last time you spent time grumbling, moaning and complaining about life?

4. When you look at your world, are you pessimistic about everything that's going wrong?

5. When you look at your world, do find yourself celebrating God's common grace?

6. Do you view yourself as one who has been constantly short-changed and neglected?

7. Do you view yourself as one who has been unfairly showered with blessings?

8. How often do you fill in the blank with grumbling, like "If only I had _____" or "I wish _______ was different"?

9. How often do you fill in the blank with gratitude, like "I can't believe God has given me _________"?

10. In your relationships, are you encouraging friends and family to continue their grumbling?

11. In your relationships, are you encouraging friends and family to find reasons to give thanks to God?

12. In your relationships, do you find yourself frequently tearing others down?

13. In your relationships, do you find yourself frequently building others up?


When Crestwood MB Church began its transition period over six months ago, this is the logo we designed to carry the weight of its message and its mission. The circle represented the transition period itself. The dotted arrow represented the people of Crestwood participating in the process to move the church through the transition period to discover and become what God desires for it Next.  CrestwoodNext has been more than just the name of a transition. It has been a strategic journey toward renewed spiritual, organizational, and ministry health. We have been seeking to learn biblically, spiritually, and practically what it means to move forward as a church. We’ve known that it could only happen by God’s grace through faith, prayer, change, and hard work. The people who accepted the challenge have been diligent and passionate. They have been open to grow personally and change corporately. It has been a blessing just to watch them as they worked so hard, listened so intently, and served so sacrificially. But it’s all been worth it — for the sake of the gospel, for the people of this church, for the spiritual need in this city, and for God’s glory. CrestwoodNext was the first phase of the Journey.  Welcome to Phase 2…

When Crestwood MB Church began its transition period over six months ago, this is the logo we designed to carry the weight of its message and its mission. The circle represented the transition period itself. The dotted arrow represented the people of Crestwood participating in the process to move the church through the transition period to discover and become what God desires for it Next.

CrestwoodNext has been more than just the name of a transition. It has been a strategic journey toward renewed spiritual, organizational, and ministry health. We have been seeking to learn biblically, spiritually, and practically what it means to move forward as a church. We’ve known that it could only happen by God’s grace through faith, prayer, change, and hard work. The people who accepted the challenge have been diligent and passionate. They have been open to grow personally and change corporately. It has been a blessing just to watch them as they worked so hard, listened so intently, and served so sacrificially. But it’s all been worth it — for the sake of the gospel, for the people of this church, for the spiritual need in this city, and for God’s glory. CrestwoodNext was the first phase of the Journey.

Welcome to Phase 2…

CrestwoodNow is established upon God’s goodness to his church, and this church in particular. This new logo carries the message, seen within its design, that we have been greatly encouraged by the  signs of life  in the church throughout the CrestwoodNext phase of the transition. This church is not dead! It has a heartbeat! It is alive! This was affirmed and reaffirmed many times through the people who faithfully participated in the Sunday Services, Teaching Times, Saturday Seminars, Fellowship Breakfasts, Youth Nights, Group Discussions, Prayer Meetings, and even a Summer Sabbath where we rested for four of the eight weekends this summer. During the CrestwoodNext phase of the transition, we were  finding our way forward . In the new CrestwoodNow phase of the transition we are  looking forward . Specifically, we will be focussing biblically on the mission of every church, the core values of a healthy church, and God’s unique vision for this church. Ultimately, we are praying and preparing for God’s timing and help to call Crestwood’s next pastor to lead our church. These are very exciting days for CMBC.

CrestwoodNow is established upon God’s goodness to his church, and this church in particular. This new logo carries the message, seen within its design, that we have been greatly encouraged by the signs of life in the church throughout the CrestwoodNext phase of the transition. This church is not dead! It has a heartbeat! It is alive! This was affirmed and reaffirmed many times through the people who faithfully participated in the Sunday Services, Teaching Times, Saturday Seminars, Fellowship Breakfasts, Youth Nights, Group Discussions, Prayer Meetings, and even a Summer Sabbath where we rested for four of the eight weekends this summer. During the CrestwoodNext phase of the transition, we were finding our way forward. In the new CrestwoodNow phase of the transition we are looking forward. Specifically, we will be focussing biblically on the mission of every church, the core values of a healthy church, and God’s unique vision for this church. Ultimately, we are praying and preparing for God’s timing and help to call Crestwood’s next pastor to lead our church. These are very exciting days for CMBC.

“You have a God who hears you, the power of love behind you, the Holy Spirit within you, and all of heaven ahead of you. If you have the Shepherd, you have grace for every sin, direction for every turn, a candle for every corner and an anchor for every storm. You have everything you need.”
— Max Lucado
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TEACHING & DOWNLOADS

Listen, watch, and download the teaching sessions and accompanying presentations.

 
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communication

Watch encouraging video messages from Pastor Colin, make appointments, or ask questions!

 
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SCHEDULE

See the CrestwoodNow schedule for September - October